Islamic Lifestyle

Digital Culture and Religion in Asia

Kamaludeen Mohamed Nasir | 22 January, 2018 | Industry Report
 Print |  Download

MI_KAMALUDEEN_0000001

Kamaludeen Mohamed Nasir

Associate Professor of Sociology, College of Humanities, Arts, & Social Sciences


In 2017 Kamaludeen won the Nanyang Research Award for being one of the three best young professors university wide. He is the author of five books namely, Muslims as Minorities: History and Social Realities of Muslims in Singapore (2009), Muslims in Singapore: Piety, Politics and Policies (2010), The Future of Singapore: Population, Society and the Nature of the State (2014), Digital Culture and Religion in Asia (2016) and Globalized Muslim Youth in the Asia Pacific: Popular Culture in Singapore and Sydney (2016). In 2013, he co-edited The Sociology of Islam: Collected Essays of Bryan S. Turner. He has published articles which focus on cultural sociology, social theory, the sociology of youth, and deviance and social control. He is the associate editor for ‘social stratification’ in the forthcoming Blackwell Encyclopedia of Social Theory (2017), an Editorial Board Member of the book series, ‘Popular Culture, Religion and Society: A Social-Scientific Approach’ (Springer) and the co-chief editor of the book series, 'Routledge Studies on Islam and Muslims in Southeast Asia'. He is currently the Director of Peace Studies at the United Nations Association of Singapore.

kamaludeen@ntu.edu.sg

DOCUMENT INFO

DescriptionThis paper elaborates on the term Islamization and interlinks it to the Muslim digital culture on Muslim websites and social media platforms that are heavily used by Muslims. It also aims at highlighting the social engagement benefits to the Ummah and Muslims that are living in foreign countries
Executive SummaryThis paper primarily focuses on the current internet and social media trends in Southeast Asia, while also reflecting on the Muslim population digital engagement on Muslim websites all the way to the latest social media platforms. It further questions the effectiveness for Muslims in engaging with each other across the globe and how those social engagements are benefiting the Muslim Ummah